CNBC Really Screws Up…

I don’t know what’s worse; that CNBC set up a stupid password testing page, which not only stored the password but sent it to 3rd parties to boot…OR…that CNBC has tried to pretend like the whole thing never happened. Engadget’s Violet Blue has more

But rather than respond directly to researchers or critics, CNBC deleted the entire page without a peep. The article was removed and the page left as “not found,” all without leaving a note in its place explaining what happened to the content. The CNBC Twitter account removed its original tweet about the article in an attempt to pretend like nothing happened. On top of it all, the article’s author made his Twitter account private.

According to ad-industry platform Thalamus, CNBC.com gets around 6.6M unique visitors a month and 204M monthly page views. While it’s unknown how many people were affected by this incident, it’s safe to say that some people seriously need to be told by CNBC to change their passwords, ASAP.

It goes without saying that this “password tester” should never have been made — and no one should have been told to use it.

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