More Ailes/Carlson…

I said yesterday that I was going to wait until some real news showed up. Well today we got some. the Chicago Reader’s Michael Miner writes about one of the accusers from the past…

In 1988 she saw Ailes rise to national prominence as the media svengali in Bush’s come-from-behind victory over Michael Dukakis, the artisan of negativity chiefly responsible for Bush’s devastating “revolving door” TV attack ad. Four years later Bush ran for reelection, and Susan expected more of the same from Ailes. (Ultimately, he had no formal role in Bush’s 1992 campaign.) Susan typed up an account of the Mike Douglas Show encounter and sent it to the primary alternative newspaper in what was by then her home town, LA Weekly. “Roger, You Made Me a Democrat,” she called her story, and went on to say that, pre-Ailes, she’d been a “Goldwater Girl,” her mother a Republican committeewoman.

The story she submitted in 1992 was a more detailed version of the account just published by New York Magazine. Jay Levin, the editor of LA Weekly at the time, remembers it. Levin assigned a staff writer, Ron Curran, to call Ailes. “We had expected the usual ‘She’s lying and I will sue you,'” says Levin; “Instead, Curran said he got a kind of mumbling self-pity from Ailes. So I decided I needed to hear him myself.”

Levin got the same. “To the best of my memory,” he says, “Ailes repeated something about being in a bad place in his past life. He didn’t make any threats and he didn’t really make any clear denial. He was fumbling around in self-pity. I said, ‘OK, to be clear, are you denying this or not? Are you saying she’s a liar? I don’t hear a clear denial.’ He said, weakly, ‘Yes, I’m denying it,’ and he wanted to know what we were going to do.”

Levin said he didn’t know, and in the end LA Weekly didn’t publish Susan’s account—for reasons I understand. This was a story requiring strong corroboration, and Levin had no other names. Furthermore, Ailes was in the east, and following up would have meant hiring a reporter there to spend weeks tracking down women who’d worked for him. There was the obvious risk of a lawsuit. And Ailes wasn’t then who he is now—one of the most powerful men in American media. “Going after him,” says Levin, “would be a misallocation of resources.”

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