Archive for the CNBC Category

CNBC Really Screws Up…

Posted in CNBC on April 1, 2016 by icn2

I don’t know what’s worse; that CNBC set up a stupid password testing page, which not only stored the password but sent it to 3rd parties to boot…OR…that CNBC has tried to pretend like the whole thing never happened. Engadget’s Violet Blue has more

But rather than respond directly to researchers or critics, CNBC deleted the entire page without a peep. The article was removed and the page left as “not found,” all without leaving a note in its place explaining what happened to the content. The CNBC Twitter account removed its original tweet about the article in an attempt to pretend like nothing happened. On top of it all, the article’s author made his Twitter account private.

According to ad-industry platform Thalamus, CNBC.com gets around 6.6M unique visitors a month and 204M monthly page views. While it’s unknown how many people were affected by this incident, it’s safe to say that some people seriously need to be told by CNBC to change their passwords, ASAP.

It goes without saying that this “password tester” should never have been made — and no one should have been told to use it.

NBC vs Dish Network…

Posted in CNBC, MSNBC on March 15, 2016 by icn2

Welll…it’s been a while since we had someone threatening to black out someone. This time its NBC and Dish Network. The LA Times’ Yvonne Villareal has more

Dish Network subscribers who want to tune in to NBC’s “The Carmichael Show” or the breakout hit “Little Big Shots” might be out of luck this weekend.

A blackout of NBC-owned TV stations and some of NBC Universal’s cable channels is on the horizon for millions of Dish subscribers Sunday if the two companies fail to ink a new carriage contract.

NBC on Monday launched a broad-based messaging campaign to inform the public that Dish could drop its portfolio of networks. The campaign features a website where Dish subscribers can learn more about the dispute, as well as TV commercials, social media alerts, radio spots and text crawls at the bottom of the TV screen that will run during network programming.

Affected channels would include MSNBC and CNBC. I saw an ad on MSNBC this morning telling viewers to call in to Dish and complain. Like that ever works…

NBCUniversal vs. Nielsen: Round 3

Posted in CNBC, MSNBC on January 13, 2016 by icn2

And the heat gets turned up a little more. The Wrap’s Tony Maglio writes about more shots fired Nielsen’s way from the NBCUniversal camp…

You better step your game up, Nielsen — because other TV ratings options are gunning for your gig.

NBC Research President Alan Wurtzel endorsed three alternatives to Nielsen on Wednesday, as the industry’s leading audience-measurement company has been considered antiquated and slow to adapt for quite a while — but has remained the top dog thanks to no real competition.
Wurtzel told critics and reporters in attendance to pay attention to the following options: Symphony Advanced Media, TiVo/Reality Mine and Rentrak/ComScore.

Wurtzel praised the first two Nielsen alternatives for providing true cross-platform measurement and requiring no third party intermediary. Symphony, which uses audio recognition via a consumer’s cell phone microphone, specifically is “generating industry interest,” he said.

NBCUniversal vs. Nielsen: Round 2…

Posted in CNBC, MSNBC, Ratings Related on January 7, 2016 by icn2

Variety’s Andrew Wallenstein writes about comments NBCUniversal Chairman of Advertising Sales and Client Partnerships, Linda Yaccarino, made about Nielsen…

She issued a call to action for the entire industry to make their frustrations known. “It’s unfair to marketers, it’s unfair to content creators, and it’s up to all of us in this industry to take a stand,” said Yaccarino. “If Nielsen isn’t up to the job, we need to walk away and reach beyond a C3 rating.”

Yaccarino cited NBCU’s move last October to take CNBC Business Day off of Nielsen as an example of the industry not having to fear negative repercussions.

“Nothing bad happened,” Yaccarino noted. “The sky didn’t fall. The network didn’t go off the air. In fact, marketers love that they’ve finally got an accurate picture of their audience. And there’s no reason we can’t do that across our entire industry.”

If Nielsen’s move toward introducing a Total Audience Measurement solution that adequately tracked viewing across platforms was supposed to satisfy NBCU, Yaccarino didn’t seem too impressed. She cited Nielsen’s expansion from 25,000 to 40,000 homes to measure wasn’t enough considering offices and bars still aren’t being monitored.

“Yes, Nielsen just debuted their Total Audience metric, but progress is slow, and we have some serious questions about their methodology,” said Yaccarino. “There’s nothing ‘total’ about that metric if you ask me.”

Mandy Drury Leaving Power Lunch…

Posted in CNBC on January 6, 2016 by icn2

TVNewser’s Chris Ariens writes that Mandy Drury is leaving Power Lunch and heading back to Australia…

After almost 6 years in the U.S., CNBC’s Mandy Drury is returning to her native Australia to be closer to family. She will continue as a CNBC contributor from Sydney.

Drury had stints with CNBC in Sydney and Singapore before moving to Englewood Cliffs in 2010. Currently, Drury is co-host of Power Lunch

Hmmmm…is this where Susan Li will slot in? Is Li going to take over for Drury on Power Lunch?

Worldwide Exchange Comes to the USA

Posted in CNBC on January 6, 2016 by icn2

I missed this news but it has ramifications here. News on News writes that CNBC International’s (yes that’s a new name but this suggests it could happen) Worldwide Exchange has come to Englewood Cliffs…

Current host Wilfred Frost is heading stateside to remain at the helm, and will be joined by Sara Eisen in Englewood Cliffs.

The move will mean that the programme will no longer fall under the remit of CNBC’s London headquarters to produce, and further cuts back the number of live television hours produced by CNBC EMEA in London.

In addition to Frost, Susan Li is also headed to the USA though it’s not clear where she’ll land at CNBC. She was part of Worldwide Exchange before the move and it’s not clear to me whether that’s still the case or she’s headed to another show.

I’ll be @CNBC NYC starting in mid-January

The Day After…

Posted in CNBC on October 30, 2015 by icn2

CNN’s Brian Stelter writes about CNBC the day after the debate from hell…

There was simultaneous crowing and cringing on Thursday. Employees who spoke on condition of anonymity for this story wished for a “do-over” and pointed fingers of blame for the chaotic production. Some pointed all the way up to CNBC president Mark Hoffman, who was also aboard Wednesday night’s charter.

“Everyone feels pretty embarrassed,” one veteran staffer said.

But some of the same employees also said they were proud that the moderators had pointedly challenged the GOP candidates and potentially changed the course of the presidential race.

They wondered aloud: Will people remember the gripes about Quintanilla, Quick and John Harwood? Will they remember the audience’s boos and the analysts’ comments that CNBC “lost control” of the debate?

They second-guessed the opening question of the debate, when Quintanilla asked each candidate, “What is your biggest weakness and what are you doing to address it?” Did it start the debate off on the wrong track?

(snip)

As the day went on, there was less and less talk about the debate on CNBC. According to one of the employees, producers were given internal guidance to move on.

At CNBC’s sister news outlets MSNBC and NBC News, producers were advised not to “pile on” the moderator controversy, according to people there.

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